Bailey’s Icebox Cake with Homemade Chocolate Wafers


Most bakers are usually reluctant to bake in the summer time, because no one wants to have yet another source of heat bearing down on them. Out comes the no-bake recipes: no-bake cheesecakes, puddings, trifles. Icebox cake (or zebra cake) is one variation of the ever-classic trifle. I strongly believe that contrasting textures makes a dish especially compelling, and the basis of most trifles: a creamy spread and a cakey layer offers that palate-teasing complexity.

I opted to make my own chocolate wafers, but I’m sure you can purchase them if you preferred to save some time. However, these wafers are top-notch, and if you’re one of those people that prefer the cookie bit of an Oreo to the cream (it’s an atrocity but I used to discard the cream bit), these cookies would really hit the spot. I also added a couple of tablespoons of Bailey’s in the whipped topping – because why not, right? It added a subtle alcoholic touch to the dessert with an accented chocolate taste Because of how light this dessert tastes in your mouth, it’s very easy to eat quite a lot of it. Restraint, my friends, restraint.


Icebox Cake
Serves 3 normal people, 2 sweet-toothed people

1 batch of chocolate wafers (recipe below)
1 cup whipping cream, chilled
2 tbsps of powdered sugar
2 tbsps of Bailey’s (optional)

Whip the cream till stiff peaks form. Add in sugar and Bailey’s, if using. Alternate layers of chocolate wafers and whipped topping in a bowl, with the wafers forming the bottommost layer. Leave to set at least overnight or up to a day, until wafers soften and become cake-like.

Chocolate Wafers
Makes about 30 to 40 wafers
Adapted from Smitten Kitchen

3/4 cups (3.38 ounces) whole wheat flour
6 tbsps (1.2 ounces) unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon baking soda
7 tablespoons unsalted butter, slightly softened
1 1/2 tablespoons whole milk
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Combine the flour, cocoa, sugar, salt, and baking soda in the bowl of food processor and pulse several times to mix thoroughly. Cut the butter into about 1/2 inch chunks and add them to the bowl. Pulse several times. Combine the milk and vanilla in a small cup. With the processor running, add the milk mixture and continue to process until the mixture clumps around the blade or the sides of the bowl. Transfer the dough to a large bowl or a cutting board and knead a few times to make sure it is evenly blended.

Form the dough into a log about 7 inches long and 1 3/4 inches in diameter. Wrap the log in wax paper or foil and refrigerate until firm, at least one hour, or until needed.

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line the baking sheets with parchment paper. Cut the log of dough into slices a scant 1/4-inch thick (I went thinner, closer to 1/8 of inch. If you’re trying to emulate the store-bought wafers, slice as thin as you can, and watch the baking time carefully, as it might be less.) and place them one inch apart on the lined sheets (cookies will spread). Bake for a total of 12 to 15 minutes. The cookies will puff up and deflate; they are done about 1 1/2 minutes after they deflate.

Cool the cookies on the baking sheets on racks, or slide the parchment onto racks to cool completely. These cookies may be stored in an airtight container for up to two weeks or be frozen for up to two months.

Note: These cookies should crisp as they cool. If they don’t, you’re not baking them long enough, in which case, return them to the oven to reheat and bake a little longer, then cool again.

Small Batch Chewy Chocolate Crackle Cookies


When you’re craving chocolatey goodness with a chewy texture, these cookies are the answer for you. They are simple to make and comfortingly delicious, with a brownie-like texture with a distinct cocoa taste. The crackling with a glossy top makes it especially visually appealing; I didn’t want to mar it with a sprinkling of sugar. I suspect they would be really good with milk; I also crumbled a cookie on top of some Greek yogurt with a spoonful of blackberry jam and it was a pretty yummy parfait.


The original recipe seemed like it’d make a pretty large batch, so I reduced it by a third with some hocus pocus and good math skills. Click through to the original link for the full recipe, but feel free to use my version if you have a kitchen scale.

Small Batch Chewy Chocolate Crackle cookies
Adapted from Kokocooks
Makes about 20 cookies

83g flour (I used whole wheat flour to no ill effect)
1/3 tsp baking soda (I used a heaping 1/4 tsp)
1/12 tsp salt (try a pinch of it)
2/3 sticks butter
2/3 cups brown sugar
3.5 tbsp cocoa powder
Dash of vanilla essence
1 large egg
2 and 2/3 oz of bittersweet chocolate, melted and cooled

Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 350°F. Line 3 cookie sheets with a baking liner or parchment paper.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, and salt. In a large bowl, beat the butter and brown sugar together. Beat in the cocoa powder and vanilla until well combined. Add the eggs one at a time, beating between each addition. Add the melted chocolate and beat on low until blended. Add the flour mixture and mix on low until just combined. (My cookies turned out fine when I added the flour mixture last, effectively making it a one bowl recipe.)

Shape dough into 1 ½ inch balls. Place balls about 2 inches apart on prepared cookie sheets. Flatten the balls slightly with the palm of your hand. Sprinkle sugar over the tops of the cookies. Bake one sheet a time, until the cookies are a bit cracked on the top, 11-12 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cookies cool on the sheet for 5 minutes. Transfer cookies to a rack and cool completely.

Frangelico Tiramisu

The good people over at Frangelico sent me a bottle of Frangelico to work into a recipe, and after several trials (mediocre brownies, subpar tiramisu) I finally made an actually delicious tiramisu. What I like best about this recipe is the lack of egg yolks in it – I know it’s not authentic, but it also means I don’t have to deal with a bunch of egg whites and worry about contracting salmonella. After all, I do make dessert primarily for one – the longer that dessert stays in the fridge, the iffier it gets.

The sad part about having to experiment with flavors is that I had to eat tiramisu every single day for lunch – while not a bad deal by most accounts, even my sweet tooth got a little tired of it. I’m glad I succeeded with a modification of Baking Bites’ recipe. The cheese and heavy cream filling was light and airy, and the strong coffee I brewed coupled with the Frangelico gave it a sweet, nutty complexity. I had attempted another recipe that involved cream cheese in the filling, and while it was okay, I found the cream cheese flavor cloying and not very traditional. This tiramisu recipe is really delicious stuff, and the perfect sort of thing to make when you don’t want to crank up the oven heat in warm weather.

Frangelico Tiramisu
Adapted from Baking Bites
Makes one 8×8 pan

8-oz mascarpone cheese, room temperature
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup heavy cream, cold*
2 tsp vanilla extract
1 cup strong brewed coffee, room temperature
1/4 cup Frangelico
approx 30-36 ladyfingers
unsweetened cocoa powder, for finishing

In a large mixing bowl, beat mascarpone, sugar, heavy cream and vanilla at high speed until mixture is fluffy and very smooth.
In a small, shallow bowl, combine coffee and Frangelico. Dip each ladyfinger into the coffee mixture to let it soak up some of the liquid (2-3 seconds) and place in the bottom of a 8×8 or 9×9-inch baking dish. The bottom of the pan should be completely covered with the ladyfingers in a single layer. Do not completely soak the ladyfingers in the coffee mixture.
When there is a full layer of ladyfingers, spread half of the cream mixture on top of them.Repeat with remaining ladyfingers and cream mixture.
Dust with cocoa powder
Cover and refrigerate overnight, or for at least 6 hours.

Serves 9-12

Mexican Chocolate Brownies


I’ve been madly craving brownies lately… and it has come to a point where shelling out $2-$4 each time I’m craving a brownie became ridiculous and I decided to take my cravings into my own hands. Introducing, the Mexican Chocolate Brownies. They’re Mexican because they are spicy. Mexican hot chocolate is known to include cinnamon… hence these brownies’ nomenclature.

The recipe called for chili powder or cayenne, which I didn’t have. I had some bird’s eye chili (or chilli padi, as we Singaporeans like to call them) and since it is ferociously spicy by most standards, I decided to just mix in the seeds from one chili for a 9 x 5 dish. It didn’t turn out very spicy at all, which I was disappointed by. However, the texture was delightfully fudgy and if you wanted a fudgy brownie, these definitely make the cut. If I were to make this again, I’d try to make sure I have all the ingredients before embarking on the recipe. Or just put in more chili seeds. The spicier, the better. Maybe next time I’d even try including Taza’s Guajillo Chili chocolate, which is probably one of the few chocolates I would happily nibble on all by itself. (Other chocolates I would do that to include Trader Joe’s Pound Plus semisweet for its good value and versatility and Vosges Chocolate for its variety. I would welcome a bar of either for my birthday, thank you very much.)

Mexican Chocolate Brownies
Adapted from Baking Bites
Makes one 9 x 5 pan

1/4 cup butter
1-oz bittersweet or dark chocolate, chopped
1 tbsp cocoa powder
1/2 cup sugar
1 large egg
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/3 cup flour
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/6 tsp ground cayenne pepper
1/8 tsp chili powder
1/8 tsp salt
1/3 cup chocolate chips (pref. semisweet or bittersweet)

Preheat oven to 350F. Line a 9×5 baking pan with aluminum foil and lightly grease.
In a small, heatproof bowl, melt butter and chocolate together. Stir with a fork until very smooth. Stir in cocoa powder until fully incorporated. Set aside to cool slightly.
In a large bowl, whisk together sugar, egg and vanilla extract. Whisking steadily, pour chocolate mixture into sugar mixture. Stir until smooth. Sift flour, ground cinnamon, cayenne pepper, chili powder and salt into the bowl and stir until just combined. Fold in chocolate chips.
Pour into prepared pan and spread into an even layer.
Bake for about 20-25 minutes, until brownies set and a toothpick inserted into the middle of the pan comes out with only a few moist crumbs, not batter, attached.
Cool in the pan completely before slicing.

Chocolate Frangelico Cake with Bailey’s Frosting


I know my frosting skills are pretty much non-existent, but I believe the inclusion of Frangelico and Bailey’s in this cake absolves my sins. I was much too impatient to let the cake cool fully and I should have let the frosting set in the fridge too, but alas. It is at least a good cake. The cake itself is pretty stellar, very moist and tender-crumbed. I had some half-and-half around, and I searched around for a good recipe that includes it, but after several scone and pie recipes (scones are no fun without fresh berries, and pies are just not my area of expertise), I finally found a winner: a chocolate cake recipe. I really like how it’s a one-bowl recipe that doesn’t require the use of a mixer. I’m all about minimizing the amount of dishes I have to wash, and if can prepare a cake using just a bowl and a spatula, that is the recipe for me. Oh, owning a digital scale really helps in reducing the dirty dishes too. I’m so glad I bought it.

I tweaked the recipe some. I don’t have coffee, so I substituted the coffee with Frangelico and water instead. The cake is probably a tad sweeter than it should be because of that, so maybe you should reduce the sugar by a couple of tablespoons if you intend on adding Frangelico, or better yet, Kahlua. The frosting recipe was originally just a chocolate buttercream, but I just eliminated the cocoa powder and replaced it with a couple tablespoons of Bailey’s. The Bailey’s that I happen to have around is the one with a hint of hazelnut, and I thought it’d complement the Frangelico in the cake. Anyway, chocolate and hazelnut, boozed up: it really doesn’t get better.

Chocolate Frangelico Cake with Bailey’s Hazelnut Frosting
Adapted from Cookie Madness
Makes two 9-inch rounds

2 1/4 cups granulated sugar
2 cups flour, lightly spooned and swept
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup unsweetened baking cocoa
1 cup half & half
2 large eggs
1/2 cup olive oil
1/2 cup Frangelico
1/2 cup water
2 1/2 teaspoons vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Spray two 9 inch round baking pans with flour-added cooking spray or grease and flour using your favorite method.

In a large mixing bowl, stir together the sugar, flour, baking soda & baking powder, salt and cocoa powder. Stir them well so that they are very thoroughly combined.

Stir in the rest of the ingredients. Batter will be wet and soupy looking. Mine had little flecks in it, but they baked away.

Bake for 35 minutes or until cakes test done. Let cool on rack for 10 minutes, then flip from pan and cool completely before frosting.

Bailey’s Frosting
Adapted from Baking Bites

3/4 cups butter, room temperature
1/4 cup half and half or milk
2 tbsps Bailey’s with a hint of hazelnut (or just the regular version is fine)
2 1/2-3 cups confectioners’ sugar

Combine all ingredients except the sugar in a large bowl and beat until very smooth. Gradually beat in the sugar until the frosting is smooth, thick and fluffy. Spread on cooled cake.

Chocolate Swirl Buns

These chocolate buns look like little caterpillars, don’t they? My bread kneading skills have improved after several failed attempts, and I think I’ve figured out how to achieve a pretty soft and fluffy texture. However, my shaping skills are still not quite there yet. I still have a long way to go before I can create good looking food. At least I can take heart in the fact that they taste good.

As you can see, I experimented with a few different shapes. I wasn’t really sure what I was doing but I figured it’d be edible anyway. The recipe for the bread is one that I’ve used several times now, and it has always worked for me. I think it’s an incredibly versatile one that can be used for both savory and sweet fillings – the last time I used it was for my hot dog buns.

The chocolate filling I actually made for this batch is actually a departure from the recipe I based it off on. I used all purpose flour instead of cake flour, and replaced the cocoa powder and butter with unsweetened chocolate. I intended on subbing it with an equal amount of unsweetened chocolate, i.e. 28g of unsweetened chocolate for 18g of cocoa powder + 10g of butter but I totally had a brain fart and added in 80g of unsweetened chocolate instead. The texture was fine, but as I tasted it, I grimaced at how bitter it was and added more sugar to it. Unfortunately, I didn’t measure how much I added in – so I recommend just following the recipe I posted below.

Chocolate Swirl Buns
Adapted from Christine’s Recipes
Makes 10 buns

Tang Zhong

25 gm bread flour
125 ml water (feel free to use milk or 50:50 milk/water; I used all milk)

Mix bread flour and water in a saucepan; continually stir over medium-low heat until your whisk/spoon leaves trails in the mixture. Take off heat and let cool.

Bread
350 gm bread flour
55 gm caster sugar
5 gm salt
56 gm egg (1 large egg)
7 gm milk powder (to increase fragrance, optional – I omitted)
125 ml milk
120 gm tangzhong (refer to this recipe for making tangzhong)
5 to 6 gm instant yeast
30 gm butter (cut into small pieces, softened at room temperature)

Chocolate Filling
Adapted from Happy Home Baking
20g cake flour
50g sugar
1 egg white (reserve egg yolk to be used as egg wash)
80ml milk (warmed)
18g cocoa powder
10g butter

Combine all dry ingredients: flour, salt, sugar and instant yeast in a bowl. Make a well in the center. Whisk and combine all wet ingredients: milk, egg and tang zhong, then add into the well of the dry ingredients. Knead until you get a dough shape and gluten has developed, then knead in the butter. Mind you, it’d be quite messy at this stage. Keep kneading until the dough is smooth, not sticky and elastic. (Tip: you might like to test if the dough is ready. Stretch the dough with two hands. If it forms a thin “membrane” that’s very elastic in texture. Use a finger to poke a hole. If the hole is a circle, not an irregular tear-off. That means you have successfully kneaded the dough to a perfect stage. Yet, don’t over-knead the dough. Otherwise all the tissues inside would be broken apart.) The time of kneading all depends on how hard and fast you knead.

Knead the dough into a ball shape. Place in a greased bowl and cover with a wet towel or cling wrap. Let it proof till it’s doubled in size, about 40 minutes (Note: the time will vary and depends on the weather. The best temperature for proofing is 28C.)

While waiting for dough to rise, make chocolate paste. Mix sugar and cake flour into the egg white until smooth. Place milk in a saucepan and heat till just simmering. Add coca powder into the milk and stir till cocoa powder is incorporated into milk. Add egg white mixture into the cocoa mixture and stir over low fire till mixture thickens. Add in butter and stir till incorporated. Leave chocolate paste to cool. Keep refrigerated before use.

Once dough has doubled in size, transfer to a clean floured surface. Deflate and divide the dough into ten equal portions. Knead into ball shapes. Cover with cling wrap, let rest for 15 minutes.

Knead each portion into a flat circular shape and place about two tablespoons of chocolate filling inside. Place rolls on a tray lined with baking paper, covered with cling wrap or a wet towel. Leave it for the 2nd round of proofing, about 45 to 60 minutes, until double in size.

Brush whisked egg on surface of rolls. (I omitted this) Bake in a pre-heated 180C (356F) oven for 30 minutes, or until golden brown. Transfer onto a wire rack and let cool completely.

Chocolate Stout Cupcakes

This is how chocolate cake should be. With stout in it. Don’t be surprised if I sneak a spoonful of stout into future chocolate cakes and brownies. After attempting this recipe twice, I think stout is going to be my favorite alcohol to bake with. It complements chocolate extremely well, and the half cup that goes into a batch of a dozen cupcakes leaves you with more than enough beer in the bottle to sip as you work along. Baking whilst tipsy is quite enjoyable.
This recipe yields an incredibly moist cake that is also very straightforward to put together. I used a cream cheese frosting for this batch, but I think adding a tablespoonful of Bailey’s to the frosting would go wonderful with the cake. As a testament to how truly awesome this recipe is, I made it twice. In a row. The first time, I used Brooklyn Brewery’s limited edition Dark Chocolate Stout, and it was quite fabulous. Guinness is delicious too, but I would recommend using chocolate stout if you can find some. I also halved the original recipe, so click through if you want to scale up.

Chocolate Stout Cupcakes
Adapted from Cookie Madness
Makes 1 dozen cupcakes

1/2 cup Guinness Stout (or dark chocolate stout)
1 sticks butter (4 oz)
3/8 cup Dutch process unsweetened cocoa powder or Hershey’s Dark
1 cups all purpose flour
1 cups granulated sugar
3/4 teaspoons baking soda
3/8 teaspoons salt
1 large eggs
1/3 cup sour cream

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line 12 muffin tins with paper liners.

Place butter in a saucepan and turn heat to medium. When butter is almost completely melted, add stout and cook over medium until mixture starts to simmer. Reduce heat slightly, add cocoa powder and stir or whisk until smooth. Remove from heat.

In a mixing bowl, thoroughly whisk together flour, sugar, baking soda and salt.

In a second bowl, using an electric mixer, beat eggs until thick and lemon colored – beat for a full five minutes. Add the sour cream and beat until combined. Add the stout mixture to the egg mixture and stir just until mixed. Add the flour mixture and stir until well mixed.

Divide the batter equally among the muffin tins. Bake for 20-25 minutes minutes or until cakes test done (toothpick inserted comes out clean). Cool in pans for 10 minutes, then let cool on a cooling rack.

Cream Cheese Frosting
Adapted from Allrecipes
Makes 1 1/2 cups

8 oz cream cheese, softened
1/4 cup butter, softened
1 cups sifted confectioners’ sugar

Cream cream cheese and butter together till light and fluffy. Mix in the sugar. Refrigerate after use.

Red Velvet Cheesecake Brownies

As meaningless as the words “red velvet” as a flavor might be if you’re not American, I was very intrigued by it. Red velvet. Doesn’t that sound luscious, calling to mind imagery of rich, sensuous, luxury? And red velvet desserts are often visually very striking as well. (Unless you make an albino red velvet cake, like I did.) I know it’s all food coloring, but for me, the best part of a red velvet cake is its cream cheese frosting. What really got me into baking was cheesecake. I think my first ever successful baking experiment was a rainbow cheesecake, which you can view here. Since then, cream cheese and I have had a great affinity for each other.

What better way to maximize the cheesecake effect than to incarnate red velvet in a red velvet cheesecake brownie form? This recipe is very easy to follow. Texture-wise, it’s not quite as fudgey as I’d like, but I wouldn’t call it cakey either. It falls squarely in the middle of the two, but gets fudgier if you chill the brownies before eating. I also have a pretty hard time getting the cheesecake layer to marble nicely, but I think that’s because I put too much of the brownie layer on top. I think the trick is to reserve less of the batter than you think you might need.

Red Velvet Cheesecake Brownies
Adapted from FoodNetwork.com
Makes 1 8×8 inch pan

Red Velvet Brownie Layer:

6 tbsps unsalted butter
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup cocoa powder
Pinch salt
1 tablespoon red food coloring
1 teaspoon vinegar
2 eggs
3/4 cup all-purpose flour

Cream Cheese Layer:

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/4 cup sugar
1 egg
1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Butter an 8 by 8-inch baking pan or line it with parchment/aluminum foil, and set aside.

Brownie layer: In a saucepan on medium heat melt the butter. Remove the butter to a large bowl and add the sugar, vanilla, cocoa powder, salt, food coloring, and vinegar, in that order, mixing between additions. Whisk the eggs in a small bowl and stir it into the cocoa mix. Fold in the flour until lightly combined. Stir in the walnuts and pour the batter into the prepared baking pan, saving 1/4 cup of the batter for the top.

Cream cheese layer: Blend together the cream cheese, sugar, egg, and vanilla in a medium bowl. Gently spread the cream cheese layer on top of the brownie batter in the pan. Dollop the remaining brownie batter over the cream cheese layer. Using a skewer or the tip of a knife, drag the tip through the cream cheese mixture to create a swirl pattern. Bake the brownies for 30 minutes. Remove to a cooling rack and allow them to cool completely before cutting.

Red Wine Chocolate Cupcakes

I like putting booze in sweets. There’s something enticingly sacrilegious about it. Cakes and cookies are sweet, innocent treats that are just about the simplest pleasures one could derive from life. But putting booze in a cupcake is like injecting vice into the guileless dessert; it’s naughty – but I like it.

The red wine does not bake off, so you definitely get to taste it. I really like how the cocoa powder and the cinnamon in the recipe sets it off. I think this recipe is ideal if you like red wine – I’m not a huge red wine person but I simply had some around the house that was just itching to be used. I also halved the original recipe and omitted the extra egg yolk, and I don’t think it missed the additional fat.

Red Wine Chocolate Cupcakes
Adapted from Smitten Kitchen
Makes 1 9-inch round cake

Cake
6 tablespoons (85 grams) unsalted butter, at room temperature
3/4 cup (179 grams) firmly packed dark brown sugar (I used light brown sugar)
1/4 cup (50 grams) white granulated sugar
1 large egg + 1 large egg yolk, at room temperature (I omitted the yolk)
3/4 cup (177 ml) red wine, any kind you like*
1 teaspoon (5 ml) vanilla extract
1 cup + 1 tablespoon (133 grams) all-purpose flour
1/2 cup (41 grams) Dutch cocoa powder (I used regular cocoa powder, no problems there)
1/8 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon table salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Topping (I omitted this)
1/2 cup mascarpone cheese
1/2 cup (118 grams) chilled heavy or whipping cream
2 tablespoons (25 grams) granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

Make the cake: Preheat the oven to 325°F. Line the bottom of a 9-inch round cake pan with parchment, and either butter and lightly flour the parchment and exposed sides of the pan, or spray the interior with a nonstick spray. In a large bowl, on the medium speed of an electric mixer, cream the butter until smooth. Add the sugars and beat until fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the egg and yolk and beat well, then the red wine and vanilla. Don’t worry if the batter looks a little uneven. Sift the flour, cocoa, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon and salt together, right over your wet ingredients. Mix until 3/4 combined, then fold the rest together with a rubber spatula. Spread batter in prepared pan. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean. The top of the cake should be shiny and smooth, like a puddle of chocolate. Cool in pan on a rack for about 10 minutes, then flip out of pan and cool the rest of the way on a cooling rack. This cake keeps well at room temperature or in the fridge. It looks pretty dusted with powdered sugar.

Make the topping: Whip mascarpone, cream, sugar and vanilla together until soft peaks form — don’t overwhip. Dollop generously on each slice of cake. It can also be covered and refrigerated for up to 4 hours.

Notes: I halved the recipe and made 7 cupcakes, and baked it for about 20 minutes. But definitely start checking at 15, because oven temperatures vary across the board.

Giant Whoopie Pie

There’s nothing like a super-sized version of an ordinary dessert that really wows the kid in all of us. It kind of takes you back to those days when you were much, much smaller, and everything just simply looked larger from our lower vantage points and fit bigger in our tiny hands. This whoopie pie strives to recreate that.

This whoopie pie came up to about 7 inches wide. I halved a Recipe.com recipe and it still turned out that big! I had wanted to make a whipped cream filling to substitute for the calorific buttercream the recipe recommended, but my heavy cream had curdled in my fridge and I used canned whipped cream instead. I apologize to all whipped cream purists. Sigh. One thing I’d like to point out is that the cake was definitely made to hold a sweeter buttercream, so the cake itself wasn’t very sweet. I recommend upping the sugar by about 3 or 4 tablespoons.

Giant Whoopie Pie
Adapted from Recipe.com
Makes a 7-inch whoopie pie

6 tbsp butter, softened
1/4 cup granulated sugar (maybe add 3 tbsps if you want it sweeter)
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/16 teaspoon salt
1 eggs
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup milk

Whipped Cream Filling
1 cup heavy cream
2 tbsp granulated sugar
1 tsp vanilla

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line two very extra-large cookie sheets with parchment paper. Draw two 4-inch circles on the parchment paper on each cookie sheet, leaving 4 inches between the circles. Turn paper over so the ink is on the bottom of the paper; set aside.

2. In a large bowl, beat butter with an electric mixer on medium to high speed for 30 seconds. Add granulated sugar, brown sugar, baking soda, and salt. Beat until well combined, scraping bowl occasionally. Beat in eggs and vanilla until combined. In a medium bowl, stir together flour and cocoa powder. Add flour mixture and milk alternately to butter mixture, beating on low speed after each addition just until mixture is combined.

3. Spoon dough evenly on top of circles on prepared cookie sheets. Spread the dough evenly on layers in each circle. Bake in the preheated oven about 15 minutes or until cookies are set. Cool completely on sheets on wire racks.

4. Add sugar to heavy cream. Whip the soft peaks form. Add vanilla essence.

4. Using a large spatula, invert one of the cookies onto a serving platter. Spread with half of the whipped cream filling. Top with another cookie, flat side down.