Dark Chocolate Rum Cake Balls

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I made some of these incredible chocolate rum cake balls for a work party and judging by how only two out of 60+ balls were left at the end of it, I’m guessing they were a big hit. Chocolate and booze just never goes wrong!

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As someone who prides herself on making things from scratch, I opted to make the chocolate cake and the glaze from scratch, even though I would be mashing them up into little balls later. The original recipe didn’t include rum, but I subbed some of the hot water that went into the cake with rum for some added booze. The cake itself was pretty darn delicious and moist and rich, but I knew I couldn’t just bring in a sheet cake to the party. No, that wouldn’t have been nearly as impressive nor delicious. I saved half the cake for non-party eating purposes, giving it away to appreciative friends who don’t get no homemade goodies all that often.

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As for the other half, I smushed it all up into little balls, while also throwing in some rum, heavy cream, and chocolate sauce, the proportions of which I eyeballed until the cake mixture became suitably compact.

While the original recipe called for a dark chocolate coating, I knew it was going to be a bit too bitter, so I used half milk chocolate and half dark chocolate instead. It was an excellent call.

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Dark Chocolate Rum Cake Balls
Adapted from Cookie Madness
Makes 60~ balls

Ingredients
1 3/4 cups (8 oz) all-purpose flour
2 cups granulated sugar
3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, natural type (try Dutch)
1 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1 cup milk, room temperature
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1/2 cup boiling water (or coffee)
1/2 cup rum

Ganache
3 ounces of chopped semisweet chocolate
3 ounces of heavy cream
6 oz milk chocolate
6 oz semisweet chocolate

Instructions
Preheat oven to 325 F. Spray a 13×9 inch pan with flour-added baking spray.
Mix together flour, sugar, cocoa, soda, baking powder and salt in large bowl. Add oil, milk, eggs and vanilla. Beat two minutes with electric mixer at medium speed. Stir in water and rum until blended. Batter will be thin.
Pour batter in the pan and bake for 45-50 minutes or until skewer or pick inserted comes out clean.
Let the cake sit in the pan for about 10 minutes, then carefully turn it from the Bundt.
Let the cake cool and then drizzle it with ganache. To make ganache, heat 3 ounces of heavy cream in microwave or saucepan. Pour over 3 oz chopped dark chocolate and stir until smooth. Let cool until thick enough to drizzle.

When you are ready to make the cake balls, set aside half the cake in a large mixing bowl. Mash up the cake. If you used all the ganache in the recipe, you won’t need any extra. Add rum, heavy cream and/or chocolate sauce until cake balls hold together. I recommend adding more rum than the other two ingredients.

Line a baking sheet with wax paper or parchment. Shape the scoops into smooth balls. Line the balls up on a tray, cover the with plastic wrap and put them in the freezer until firm.

In a chocolate melting pot, top of a double boiler or in the microwave, melt the milk and semisweet chocolate.

Dip cake balls into melted chocolate and lift with two forks, allowing extra chocolate to drip back into the pot. Put the balls on a wax paper lined cookie sheet to set.

Chocolate Pudding (Without Cornstarch)

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Most homemade pudding recipes require the use of cornstarch to solidify its texture, but not having any on hand, I used a recipe that used flour as a thickener instead, and the results were pretty good! Flour creates a more custard-like texture than cornstarch would; a spoon that cuts into a pudding thickened with flour leaves a spoon-shaped cavity, whereas a cornstarch-thickened pudding probably wouldn’t. The downside to this recipe is that it requires an immersion stick blender, whereas a cornstarch-thickened pudding just requires your tireless attention for about 15 minutes.

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This recipe ended up really rich for how little pudding it generates, so it really stretches your dessert dollar. It’s rich and chocolatey, and for some added texture, grate some semisweet chocolate over it.

Chocolate Pudding (Without Cornstarch)
Makes 4-5 portions
From Christian HomeKeeper

1/4 c flour
6 Tablespoons sugar
2 1/3 cups whole milk (I used 2% and it was fine)
dash of salt
4 Tablespoons cocoa powder
2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon good vanilla extract

Place all dry ingredients in a heavy saucepan. Gradually add the milk and butter, blending thoroughly with a stick blender.
Set over a low flame and stir until the pudding thickens and starts to bubble when you stop stirring for a moment.
Turn off heat. Cool slightly, blend in vanilla.

P.S. Check out my blog post: It’s True, The Way To A Man’s Heart *Is* Through His Stomach

Chocolate Mint Creams


Baking is such a joy with my new Kitchenaid. It truly is. The possibilities that were once out of my reach are now firmly within my grasp. Macarons, Swiss meringues, chiffon cakes, whipping cream with ease… all of these are now possible with the flick of a switch. Furthermore, Thanksgiving and Christmas are great reasons to bake up all manners of delectable desserts. Today, I present to you chocolate mint creams, made possible by a powerful Kitchenaid.

The stand mixer helped to create a fluffy, lighter-than-air, melt-in-your-mouth texture of the mint cream. I wanted my peppermint patties to be more creamy than firm, so I added a bit more liquid than in the original recipe. This makes the mint cream a bit hard to work with but the texture is divine. You have to work quickly when coating these in melted chocolate. You are dunking sugar in dough form in hot melted chocolate; its natural inclination would be to melt into the chocolate. I would insist on using pure peppermint oil instead of peppermint extract. Peppermint oil might be expensive, but a little goes a long way, and the cooling sensation each bonbon leaves in your mouth lasts a long time.

Chocolate Mint Creams
Adapted from Joy of Baking
Makes 40-50 bonbons

Mint creams:

2 cups (240 grams) confectioners (powdered or icing) sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons (20 grams) unsalted butter, softened
1/4 teaspoon peppermint oil (make sure it is labeled for internal use) (do not use peppermint extract)
1/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
3 tablespoons milk

Chocolate coating (you might have to make more of this depending on how thickly you coat your bonbons):

8 ounces (240 grams) semi sweet or bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped
1 tablespoon (12 grams) shortening or butter

Mint creams: Line a cookie sheet with aluminum foil, smoothing out any wrinkles. Lightly dust the foil with confectioners sugar (powdered or icing).

In the bowl of your electric mixer, or with a hand mixer, beat (on low speed) the sugar, butter, peppermint oil, vanilla extract, and evaporated milk until combined. Increase the speed to medium-high and beat until very creamy (about 2-3 minutes). Transfer the batter to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and place in the freezer to chill until firm enough to roll into balls (about an hour).

Roll the batter into 1/2 inch balls and place on the prepared pan. Cover and place in the freezer until the patties are firm (at least one hour, or even overnight).

Chocolate coating: Melt the chocolate and shortening in a heatproof bowl placed over a saucepan of simmering water. Remove the patties from the refrigerator and dip, one ball at a time, into the melted chocolate. (You can use 2 forks or a chocolate dipping fork.) Let any excess chocolate drip back into the bowl and then place the balls back on the foil. Once all the balls have been dipped in the chocolate, return to the refrigerator to chill until firm (30 – 60 minutes). Store in the refrigerator in an airtight container (separate layers with parchment paper or wax paper) for up to one month.

Bacon Cornbread Pancakes

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I’ve had a really random hankering for pancakes – something I never crave for – and then once I made my first ever batch with a really excellent recipe from Allrecipes, I’ve been making them in various incarnations since. Based on experience, we know that cornbread is often studded with bacon. We also know that bacon is often served alongside pancakes. Incorporating all three flavors can’t go wrong! And so I did.

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Pancakes are so gratifying because they’re so quick and easy to make. They’re also a socially acceptable way to eat dessert for breakfast, and I do not mind that at all. I edited the original recipe by replacing half of the all-purpose flour with corn flour, and using bacon fat instead of butter for the fat in the pancakes. These are definitely still sweet, with just a hint of smokiness and Southern flavor from the cornmeal. These are supremely good with maple syrup and with thick cut bacon.

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Bacon Cornbread Pancakes
Makes 7 pancakes
Adapted from Allrecipes

3/4 cup milk
2 tablespoons white vinegar
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup fine cornmeal
2 tablespoons white sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 egg
2 tablespoons bacon fat, melted
cooking spray

1. Combine milk with vinegar in a medium bowl and set aside for 5 minutes to “sour”.
2. Combine flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Whisk egg and bacon fat into “soured” milk. Pour the flour mixture into the wet ingredients and whisk until lumps are gone.
3. Heat a large skillet over medium heat, and coat with cooking spray. Pour 1/4 cupfuls of batter onto the skillet, and cook until bubbles appear on the surface. Flip with a spatula, and cook until browned on the other side.

Ovaltine Brownie Cake


I don’t think Ovaltine is very popular in America, so here’s a quick lowdown on what it is. It is a delicious malt chocolate dairy product that you dissolve into hot water and drink. It’s often marketed as a restorative energy drink or something that you imbibe to kickstart your day right. I had some lying around, and since I hardly ever drank it, I decided to make a cake out of it.

There are many things about this recipe I would like to highlight. Firstly, it’s in weight measurements, so you can’t really make this if you don’t have a scale. Secondly, I used whole wheat flour instead of regular and as usual, it imparts a slightly chewier texture to any baked good. Thirdly, this cake is a lot less chocolatey than it looks: although it is a rich dark brown, the flavor is more mild and milky than deep and chocolatey. Fourthly, I didn’t have enough Ovaltine powder, but if I did, I would’ve sprinkled it all over the top for extra flavor. I really like raw Ovaltine powder. Fifthly, the texture of this is more like a cakey brownie. It’s a little bit fudgey but also a little bit cakey.

With that said, bake away!

Ovaltine Brownie Cake
Makes 1 9-inch pan
Adapted from Pencil Kitchen

87g butter, softened
87g white sugar
1 1/2 eggs (beat two eggs and use half of the mixture)
1 tsp vanilla
A pinch of instant coffee powder
100 ml milk (I used chocolate milk instead of regular, because that’s all I had. It was okay!)
125g Ovaltine powder
15g cocoa powder
100g all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
1 pinch salt

Preheat oven to 350F. Grease and flour a 9-inch cake pan. Dissolve 50g of Ovaltine and coffee into warm milk. Let cool to room temperature.

Sift together flour, cocoa, 50g Ovaltine, baking powder and salt. Set aside.

Cream together butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in egg mixture and stir in vanilla.

Beat in the flour mixture and milk alternately, starting and ending with the dry ingredients.

Bake for 20-30 minutes, until a toothpick inserted comes out clean. Let cool in pan for ten minutes.

Invert cake onto a plate. Brush the cake with melted salted butter and dust with remaining 25g of Ovaltine, or more if you prefer.

Alton Brown’s Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookie


I had a little bit of down time today, and as a matter of principle I find it nearly impossible to have free time and not do anything. I always feel the need to convert free time into productive energy, so I decided to bake some chocolate chip cookies today. (I also baked some oatmeal chocolate chip cookies) While I already have a standby chocolate chip cookie recipe, I know there are tons of chocolate chip cookie recipes out there that claim to be the recipe that end all recipes. So I decided to try one from Alton Brown. This recipe is unusual in that it employs bread flour instead of all-purpose. Since bread flour has a higher gluten content, I expect these cookies to be more solid structurally and bake up thicker – but my scientific knowledge of differing gluten levels in flours ends here.


Chewy as an adjective for these cookies are a misnomer – I thought they were more fluffy and airy, almost cake-like but not quite. I loved how the recipe is clearly catered for those with a kitchen scale. I hemmed and hawed over getting my digital kitchen scale, but it is by far the best purchase I’ve procured for my baking expeditions to date. It has saved me a good many dishes to wash by hand.

This recipe is easy enough to bake up, but I would much rather use another recipe that I can halve easily: the single egg and egg yolk in this recipe makes that tricky.

Alton Brown’s Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookie
Adapted from Food Network
Makes 2 dozen cookies

Ingredients

8 ounces unsalted butter
12 ounces bread flour
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 ounces granulated sugar
8 ounces light brown sugar
1 large egg
1 large egg yolk
1 ounce whole milk (I used water because I didn’t have any milk)
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
12 ounces semisweet chocolate chips

Directions

Melt the butter in a 2-quart saucepan over low heat. Set aside to cool slightly.

Sift together the flour, salt and baking soda onto a paper plate. Pour the butter into your stand mixer’s work bowl. Add the sugar and brown sugar and beat with the paddle attachment on medium speed for 2 minutes.

Meanwhile, whisk together the whole egg, the egg yolk, milk and vanilla extract in a measuring cup. Reduce the mixer speed and slowly add the egg mixture. Mix until thoroughly combined, about 30 seconds.

Using the paper plate as a slide, gradually integrate the dry ingredients, stopping a couple of times to scrape down the sides of the bowl. Once the flour is worked in, drop the speed to “stir” and add the chocolate chips. Chill the dough for 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F and place racks in the top third and bottom third of the oven.

Scoop the dough into 1 1/2-ounce portions onto parchment-lined half sheet pans, 6 cookies per sheet. Bake 2 sheets at a time for 15 minutes, rotating the pans halfway through. Remove from the oven, slide the parchment with the cookies onto a cooling rack and wait at least 5 minutes before devouring.

Notes: The darker the sugar you use, the chewier your cookies will be.

Chocolate Swirl Buns

These chocolate buns look like little caterpillars, don’t they? My bread kneading skills have improved after several failed attempts, and I think I’ve figured out how to achieve a pretty soft and fluffy texture. However, my shaping skills are still not quite there yet. I still have a long way to go before I can create good looking food. At least I can take heart in the fact that they taste good.

As you can see, I experimented with a few different shapes. I wasn’t really sure what I was doing but I figured it’d be edible anyway. The recipe for the bread is one that I’ve used several times now, and it has always worked for me. I think it’s an incredibly versatile one that can be used for both savory and sweet fillings – the last time I used it was for my hot dog buns.

The chocolate filling I actually made for this batch is actually a departure from the recipe I based it off on. I used all purpose flour instead of cake flour, and replaced the cocoa powder and butter with unsweetened chocolate. I intended on subbing it with an equal amount of unsweetened chocolate, i.e. 28g of unsweetened chocolate for 18g of cocoa powder + 10g of butter but I totally had a brain fart and added in 80g of unsweetened chocolate instead. The texture was fine, but as I tasted it, I grimaced at how bitter it was and added more sugar to it. Unfortunately, I didn’t measure how much I added in – so I recommend just following the recipe I posted below.

Chocolate Swirl Buns
Adapted from Christine’s Recipes
Makes 10 buns

Tang Zhong

25 gm bread flour
125 ml water (feel free to use milk or 50:50 milk/water; I used all milk)

Mix bread flour and water in a saucepan; continually stir over medium-low heat until your whisk/spoon leaves trails in the mixture. Take off heat and let cool.

Bread
350 gm bread flour
55 gm caster sugar
5 gm salt
56 gm egg (1 large egg)
7 gm milk powder (to increase fragrance, optional – I omitted)
125 ml milk
120 gm tangzhong (refer to this recipe for making tangzhong)
5 to 6 gm instant yeast
30 gm butter (cut into small pieces, softened at room temperature)

Chocolate Filling
Adapted from Happy Home Baking
20g cake flour
50g sugar
1 egg white (reserve egg yolk to be used as egg wash)
80ml milk (warmed)
18g cocoa powder
10g butter

Combine all dry ingredients: flour, salt, sugar and instant yeast in a bowl. Make a well in the center. Whisk and combine all wet ingredients: milk, egg and tang zhong, then add into the well of the dry ingredients. Knead until you get a dough shape and gluten has developed, then knead in the butter. Mind you, it’d be quite messy at this stage. Keep kneading until the dough is smooth, not sticky and elastic. (Tip: you might like to test if the dough is ready. Stretch the dough with two hands. If it forms a thin “membrane” that’s very elastic in texture. Use a finger to poke a hole. If the hole is a circle, not an irregular tear-off. That means you have successfully kneaded the dough to a perfect stage. Yet, don’t over-knead the dough. Otherwise all the tissues inside would be broken apart.) The time of kneading all depends on how hard and fast you knead.

Knead the dough into a ball shape. Place in a greased bowl and cover with a wet towel or cling wrap. Let it proof till it’s doubled in size, about 40 minutes (Note: the time will vary and depends on the weather. The best temperature for proofing is 28C.)

While waiting for dough to rise, make chocolate paste. Mix sugar and cake flour into the egg white until smooth. Place milk in a saucepan and heat till just simmering. Add coca powder into the milk and stir till cocoa powder is incorporated into milk. Add egg white mixture into the cocoa mixture and stir over low fire till mixture thickens. Add in butter and stir till incorporated. Leave chocolate paste to cool. Keep refrigerated before use.

Once dough has doubled in size, transfer to a clean floured surface. Deflate and divide the dough into ten equal portions. Knead into ball shapes. Cover with cling wrap, let rest for 15 minutes.

Knead each portion into a flat circular shape and place about two tablespoons of chocolate filling inside. Place rolls on a tray lined with baking paper, covered with cling wrap or a wet towel. Leave it for the 2nd round of proofing, about 45 to 60 minutes, until double in size.

Brush whisked egg on surface of rolls. (I omitted this) Bake in a pre-heated 180C (356F) oven for 30 minutes, or until golden brown. Transfer onto a wire rack and let cool completely.